BENEFICIARY PARTNERS

Every year, Project by Project selects a non-profit partner based on a theme or issue that addresses current needs in the Asian American community. Check out these amazing organizations that we partnered up with and the themes we have focused on!

2018

About This Year’s Theme
Asian Americans & Immigration



2017

20th Anniversary




As we celebrate Project by Project’s 20th Anniversary, we hope to reconnect with and invite all of our past beneficiary partners to join with us once again to advance awareness of important social issues in the Los Angeles API community.

2016

LGBTQ




“The mission of APAIT is to positively impact the quality of life for medically underserved communities living with or at-risk for HIV/AIDS and other health disparities through a seamless continuum of culturally competent and linguistically appropriate programs in Southern California. APAIT is a division of Special Service for Groups (SSG), a non-profit human service agency that was incorporated in 1952 and operates over 25 multi-ethnic, multi-service programs in greater Los Angeles.”

2015

Housing




“Our mission is to build healthy and safe communities by addressing the root causes and the consequences of family violence and violence against women.”

2014

Mental Health




“Our mission is to enrich the lives of children and families through counseling and caring. We provide culturally sensitive and language specific services with expertise in the immigrant and refugee Asian Pacific Islander populations.”

2013

The Arts




“As the nation’s premier Asian American theatre organization, East West Players produces artistic works and educational programs that foster dialogue exploring Asian Pacific experiences.”

2012

15th Anniversary




2011

Academic Education




2010

Health Care




“Our mission is to advocate for civil rights, provide legal services and education, and build coalitions to positively influence and impact Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders and to create a more equitable and harmonious society.”

2009

Economy




“To assist the development of Asian and Pacific Islander small and micro businesses in Los Angeles, especially those of low income immigrants, focusing on Chinatown and parts of the San Gabriel Valley, Koreatown, Little Tokyo, Thai Town and the Pilipino business communities.”

2008

Politics




2007

10th Anniversary




2006

Media Arts




“Visual Communications (VC) is the first non-profit organization in the nation dedicated to the honest and accurate portrayals of the Asian Pacific American peoples, communities, and heritage through the media arts. VC was created with the understanding that media and the arts are important vehicles to organize and empower communities, build connections between peoples and generations through the development of AAPI film, video, and media. The organization has created award-winning productions, nurtured and given voice to our youth and seniors, promoted new artistic talent, presented new cinema, and preserved our visual history.”

2005

Human Trafficking




“CAST is a Los Angeles–based nonprofit organization that is working to put an end to modern slavery and human trafficking through comprehensive, lifesaving services to survivors and a platform to advocate for groundbreaking policies and legislation.”

2004

Youth




2003

Seniors




“To provide a comprehensive array of social welfare and community development services to assist low income and other persons in need, and contribute to community revitalization and cultural preservation in Little Tokyo, among the broader Japanese American community in the Southland, and to provide such resources to neighboring Asian Pacific Islander and other low income communities”

2002

Domestic Violence




“With the mission to provide outstanding services and advocacy that promote better quality of life and equal opportunity for immigrants and other communities so we can fulfill our vision of thriving lives in empowered communities, the Chinatown Service Center has been offering many services in assisting immigrants adjust to American life.”